Author Norman Mailer dies at 84

posted 2007-11-10 08:58:46 by stevemay



Norman Mailer, one of the last surviving literary lions to roar out of World War II, died Saturday morning.

Mailer, 84, died of acute renal failure at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, said J. Michael Lennon, his official biographer.

In a fiesty career of highs and lows, Mailer wrote more than 40 books, won two Pulitzer Prizes and managed to be mentioned in everything from the TV show King of the Hill to John Lennon's Give Peace A Chance.

As a novelist, essayist and reporter, he took on celebrities, war, politics, boxing, God, sex and perhaps his favorite theme, the battle between good and evil.

He had hoped to write at least one more novel.

Its seeds were planted in his last novel, The Castle in the Forest (2007), which imagines Adolf Hitler's childhood, but includes a 48-page digression about the cornoration of Czar Nicholas II. (Only a writer with Mailer's self-confidence would have his narrator advise readers more interested in Hilter to skip the digression and "just turn to page 261.")

In January 2007, in an interview at his home in Provincetown, Mass, Mailer told USA TODAY that he was fascinated with the czar and Rasputin, the monk with political ambitions, a character "you couldn't make up."

But, he added, "at my age, you don't make promises," about finishing a novel. "You don't know when the ball will roll off the table."

Its seeds were planted in his last novel, The Castle in the Forest (2007), which imagines Adolf Hitler's childhood, but includes a 48-page digression about the cornoration of Czar Nicholas II. (Only a writer with Mailer's self-confidence would have his narrator advise readers more interested in Hilter to skip the digression and "just turn to page 261.")

In January 2007, in an interview at his home in Provincetown, Mass, Mailer told USA TODAY that he was fascinated with the czar and Rasputin, the monk with political ambitions, a character "you couldn't make up."

But, he added, "at my age, you don't make promises," about finishing a novel. "You don't know when the ball will roll off the table."




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